DStv CULLS DISCOVERY'S ANIMAL PLANET

Thursday, June 4, 2015

Today's interesting TV stories to read from TV with Thinus - 4 June 2015.


Why more is never enough with DStv.
DStv subscribers across Africa keep complaining about repeats although MultiChoice keeps adding TV channels to DStv.


SABC's famously matricless Hlaudi Motsoeneng says degrees and diplomas mean nothing.
He says you need brains. The SABC's beleaguered chief operating officer (COO) says "it is no use to have papers without brains". Hlaudi Motsoeneng boasts that "you see in my meetings the SABC financial officer James Aguma who has so many degrees, knows that I beat him left and right with my questions".

Why would anybody want to be on the SABC in such a toxic environment? asks Business Day in an editorial. And the SABC desperately looking for new board members after they constantly get fired.

Britain's Got Talent on M-Net (DStv 101) in scandalous dog switcheroo.
Producers blatantly switched dog Matisse in the final for another new stuntdog. Viewers go: Uhm, the dog now looks different. Producers apologise. And now the British broadcasting regulator is looking at it after viewers complained.

Jerry Munthali is out as the head of MultiChoice Zambia.
Jerry Munthali is no longer the general manager of MultiChoice Zambia; finance manager Ngoza Matakala is taking over as the acting general manager.


Sports and live sports might not be able to save the pay-TV bundle.
New research shows pay-TV subscribers wouldn't pay to stream sports over the internet without a pay-TV subscription to a bundled product. Sport content cost pay-TV operators the most but viewers won't pay for it according to the new study and it won't prevent churn. Sport is no longer the saviour of big pay-TV subscriptions.


The SABC wants to replace its old gym with a new "wellness studio".
New gym at the public broadcaster's Auckland Park head office will cost millions; new tender closes on 23 June.

The Teletubbies return to television with touch screens in their tummies.
Back on the BBC 20 years after they first appeared.

China is clamping down on reality TV shows that's hugely popular there.